Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs

News: Children

With funding from the Herb Kohl Public Service Research Competition, University of Wisconsin–Madison faculty members Barbara (Bobbi) Wolfe and Seth Pollak hosted an academic workshop on neuroscience, public policy, and poverty September 27 and 28 in Milwaukee. Discussion focused on children in poverty.

Katie Maguire-Jack (MPA ’06) and two colleagues received a $3 million grant to address substance abuse problems in Ohio. Maguire-Jack, who received her doctorate in social welfare from UW–Madison, is an assistant professor at The Ohio State University’s College of Social Work.

La Follette School Professor Jason Fletcher is the principal investigator for a $300,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) supporting research on the impacts of children’s neighborhoods on racial disparities in adult health outcomes.

Distinguished scholars Ron Haskins, Isabel Sawhill, and C. Eugene Steuerle (MA ’72, MS ’73, PhD ‘75) will discuss Improving Opportunities for Children during the 2016 Paul Offner Lecture on Thursday, November 3.

A group of researchers, including Tim Smeeding of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is proposing a universal monthly child allowance to eliminate extreme poverty among families with children in the United States.

Differences in the qualities of adolescents’ neighborhoods do not appear to have much effect on whether they have heart disease, are obese or have depression as adults, new research from La Follette School professor Jason Fletcher shows. The journal Health Affairs in its September issue published the research by Fletcher and Stephen M. McLaughlin, a Ph.D. candidate in health policy and management at Yale University.

A study published Monday in JAMA Pediatrics reveals for the first time the mechanism behind the relationship between childhood poverty and doing poorly in school.

A new analysis from the La Follette School of Public Affairs may help Wisconsin prevent more cases of child abuse by detecting patterns associated with cases returning to the system after initially being screened out.

Children missing school likely means they score lower on academic achievement tests, a new study from the La Follette School of Public Affairs finds.

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