Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs

Working with immigrant children in two countries showed Katie Lorenze that too often politicians pass legislation focused on broad, vague ideas and without thought for the often unintended consequences. "In Spain and the United States, I saw how bad public policy affects children and families every day," the second-year La Follette School student says.

The opportunities to learn quantitative skills in an international context and to study Thai brought Ryan Hohler to the La Follette School of Public Affairs.

Amanda Wilmarth wants to improve U.S. relations with China and ease tensions on the Korean Peninsula, so 10 years after completing her bachelor's degree in international relations and East Asian studies, she is back at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, pursuing a Master of International Public Affairs degree.

On September 11, 2001, Matthew Mayeshiba was a freshman planning to study viola at the University of Minnesota.  But by 2005, with the invasion of Iraq and the presidential election, "there seemed to be so many more important things in the world," says Mayeshiba, who joined the military in 2006 and later enrolled at the La Follette School.

A nongovernmental organization offering development assistance in northern Rwanda and southwestern Uganda has some new ideas for how to expand its services, thanks to recommendations from a group of La Follette School students.

A workshop report by students in the international public affairs program won the Marykathryn Kubat Award given by the American Association for Budget and Program Analysis on July 10.
A  workshop report by students in the international public affairs program is a  finalist for the Marykathryn Kubat Award given by the American  Association for Budget and Program Analysis.

For Erik Dolson, the best way to address a problem is to consider all the possible solutions. When a career advisor suggested he consider public policy schools, Dolson looked at the La Follette School and other master's programs. "Taking apart problems and fixing them with public policy sounded interesting," Dolson says.

Thursday, 20 June 2013 05:08

Student, alum meet in Shanghai

Tasty Sichuan for lunch, travel around Shanghai and fried dumplings for dinner made for a pleasant day for alum Lydia Bi and student Emily Brunjes.

Troy Hoppenjan's efforts to build a rural school last summer in Uganda garnered him honors with the Wisconsin Without Borders Recognition Award for Global Engaged Scholarship.

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