Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs

La Follette School faculty affiliate Lawrence (Lonnie) M. Berger took over as director of the Institute for Research on Poverty today (August 1).

For someone wanting to know who is poor in the United States, Geoffrey Wallace is the guy to consult. The La Follette School economist has parsed various measures of U.S. poverty and finds that 15 percent of the U.S. population was poor in 2012.

Professor Barbara Wolfe wants to know why people act the way they do and how society might help them make better choices.

The good news is that jobs, earnings and wages are rising again in Wisconsin as the economy slowly climbs back from the recession, the latest Wisconsin Poverty Report says.

For Tim Smeeding, understanding the effects of public programs on poor people is paramount. "There are lots of confusing reports out there with inaccurate findings," says Smeeding, professor of public affairs and director of the Institute for Research on Poverty.

La Follette School professor Jason M. Fletcher has won the 2013-2014 prize for the Best Research in Health & Society from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholars program at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.
The effects of poverty on brain development will be discussed in a La Follette School seminar on Tuesday, April 8, at noon in the school conference room.
Tuesday, 21 January 2014 09:54

Smeeding reflects on War on Poverty

La Follette School professor Timothy Smeeding, director of the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, discusses the War on Poverty in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Read the article …
Income inequality is on the rise, according to a national report card co-authored by La Follette School professor Timothy Smeeding, director of the Institute for Research on Poverty.
Public affairs and social work professor Maria Cancian is quoted in a New York Times article on project in New York City to study the effects of giving childless adults an income tax break equivalent to the earned-income tax credit. Read the article …
Page 5 of 10