Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs
Monday, 23 March 2015 00:00

Newspaper features Yackee, Herd

La Follette School Director Susan Webb Yackee and Professor Pamela Herd are among the College of Letters and Science faculty featured in a special section of the March 22 Wisconsin State Journal.

A New Yorker article on economic inequality mentions an analysis by La Follette School Professor Timothy Smeeding.

How the brain reflects parents' socioeconomic status and the consequences for schooling attainment is the subject of a talk on Thursday, October 9, by La Follette School economist Barbara Wolfe at 12:15 p.m. in 8417 Sewell Social Sciences.

Income inequality is on the rise, according to a national report card co-authored by La Follette School professor Timothy Smeeding, director of the Institute for Research on Poverty.
Monday, 16 December 2013 07:57

Smeeding discusses minimum wage

La Follette School professor Timothy Smeeding, director of the Institute for Research on Poverty, appeared on Wisconsin Eye's "Newsmakers" program on December 16 as part of a discussion on the minimum wage. See the video
Tuesday, 22 October 2013 09:20

Hunger Meal set for Nov. 14

A hunger meal to demonstrate social inequality and the role chance plays in a person's food security will be Thursday, November 14, from 6 to 8 p.m. at Tripp Commons in Memorial Union. Participants will randomly be assigned a meal of rice and beans, a gourmet dinner or something in between.
A hunger meal to demonstrate social inequality and the role chance plays in a person's social status will be Monday, May 6, at 6 p.m. at Tripp Commons in Memorial Union at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Reservations are due April 26.
Interconnected socioeconomic factors affect public health, 2012 alum Carly Hood notes in an opinion piece published last week by the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel.
Former Wisconsin  congressman Steve Gunderson will deliver the annual Paul Offner Memorial Lecture on Wednesday, November 14, at 5 p.m. in the Pyle Center.
Economic opportunity is not the same for everyone in the United States, new research by La Follette School director Thomas DeLeire shows. While 84 percent of Americans have higher family incomes than their parents did at the same age, those born at the top and bottom of the income ladder are likely to stay there as adults.
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